Bookshelf

September 11: Perspectives from the Field of Philanthropy Edited and published by The Foundation Center, 2002, 194 pp. Available for free download from <http://foundationcenter.org/gainknowledge/research/911/ Sept11Book1.pdf> REVIEWED BY JOHN D. GREGORY Editor Emeritus, The Philanthropist The attacks on the World Trade Center in New York and on the Pentagon were not unique in motivation, but they…

Bookshelf

The Law of Charitable and Not-for-Profit Organizations, 3rd ed. By Donald J. Bourgeois Published by Butterworths, 2002, 595 pp. $139. REVIEWED BY JOHN D. GREGORY of the Ontario Bar and Editor emeritus of The Philanthropist Human beings are social creatures. Some of our earliest collective action was devoted to survival, to making a way in…

Bookshelf

Civic Literacy: How Informed Citizens Make Democracy Work By Henry Milner Published by University Press of New England, 2002, 293 pp. US $45. cloth; US $19.95 paper. REVIEWED BY A. PAUL PROSS Professor Emeritus, School of Public Administration, Dalhousie University This book is an enquiry into the factors that contribute to informed voter choice during…

From the Editor

This volume closes with our usual mix oflaw, policy and management analysis. Professor Phillips investigates further the rule for political activity by charities in his comment on the Human Life International case. While he thinks the case was rightly decided, he also notes disturbing elements for future consideration. Blake Bromley advocates leaving the courts a…

From the Editor

This issue offers broad coverage of the issues confronting philanthropy today, from the specific to the general and from the immediate to the speculative. Our legal analysis focuses on tax law, to help those who engage in gift planning to evaluate some of the material they may see from the United States and put it…

From the Editor

This issue talks about change, imminent change and proposed change. Imminent change affects a number of Ontario hospitals and hospitals in other parts of the country. A number of provinces have been closing or merging hospitals to save money. Many of these hospitals have parallel foundations to manage their fundraising and, often, their long-term financial…

From the Editor

We launch this new volume with investigations of public and private policy. Public policy is examined at the speculative level by Arthur Drache, who considers whether Canada needs an equivalent to England’s Charity Commission (he thinks we do). At a more practical level, Blake Bromley castigates some of the measures in the February 1997 federal…

From the Editor

To close this volume of The Philanthropist, we focus primarily on management issues. Vic Murray gives us the benefit of his long experience in the sector by advising how to build better boards. Bruce Levine reports on the findings of the United Way of Lower Mainland, B.C., which conducted a survey of financial management practices…

From the Editor

This issue continues our usual combination of opinion and instruction aimed at boards, financial managers and …the public at large. Ed Waitzer, Chair of the Ontario Securities Commission, was active in philanthropy and a onetime member of our Editorial Board before his appointment. He gives us the benefit of some time for reflection in his…

From the Editor

The philanthropic¬†sector of our society is changing rapidly for economic, social and political reasons. Contributors to this issue help us better to understand some of those reasons and prepare us to cope with change. Jane Burke-Robertson discusses creating a parallel foundation, as many hospitals have done over the years. Such an organization may promote stability…