The Problems with Direction and Control

This article is the second in a series on Canadian Charities Working Internationally. ABSTRACT: Canadian charities working internationally are subject to regulations that are intended to boost accountability and ensure that charitable dollars flow to genuinely charitable activity. Recently the Canada Revenue Agency has stepped up audits of these same charities. Increased accountability demands are…

New Series: Canadian Charities Working Internationally

This article is the first in a series on Canadian Charities Working Internationally. A regulatory system, and the laws that underpin it, is ideally enabling but by necessity limiting. It’s true in business, and it should be equally true with charities. What is, however, the right balance between support and limits? When working across borders,…

Advocacy And Lobbying For Policy Change In Zimbabwe: Women’s Lobbying For A Gender-sensitive Constitution

Summary this article describes a lobbying campaign by women in zimbabwe to ensure gender sensitivity in a new constitution—a campaign being conducted in very difficult circumstances. The description of this campaign is a further illustration of how rights set out in international agreements can be applied in domestic public policy processes. While the ultimate goal…

Learning, Development, And Money: Lessons From Bangladesh

Abstract: The Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) has, in its 37 year history, become one of the largest, most diverse and most effective NGOs in the world. Its micro-lending in Bangladesh topped a billion dollars last year, but that is only a small part of a story that includes 36,000 primary schools, nation-wide health programs,…

Canadian Charities and Foreign Activities

Canadian charities that operate abroad are in the forefront of dealing with many of the most difficult global problems, including HIV/AIDS, human rights, access to education, and clean water and sanitation, to name a few. Many donors have lived abroad and have a substantial attachment to causes and communities outside of Canada, and many consider…

International Philanthropy in Action: Human Rights

Introduction International philanthropy usually brings to mind famine relief or using Canadian dollars and expertise to build wells and irrigation systems in Third World countries; however Canadian expertise can be used to protect lives and improve living conditions in another way-by sending Canadians to observe and report back on murders, disappearances and torture in other…

CIVICUS and the Challenge of International Philanthropy

In the late ’80s and early ’90s, those who watch such things realized that a global “association revolution” was underway. Citizens’ associations, people’s movements, voluntary organizations, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), mutual assistance groups, philanthropic foundations and other grassroots organizations were springing up all over the world, some of them in the most unlikely places-developing countries in…

European Convention on the Recognition of the Legal Personality of International Non-Governmental Organizations

Convention opened for signature in Strasbourg on April 24, 1986. (European Treaty Service (ETS) No. 124) Introduction The beneficial role played by voluntary and non-profit bodies is recognized in practically all countries of the world today. The freedom of peaceful assembly and the freedom of association with others are fundamental human rights. The legal status and…